Apple Streusel Upside Down Cake (GF)

Before our boys started school, we would travel to New Jersey every October to see my husband’s family and enjoy the amazingly gorgeous display of fall colors throughout the countryside. While there, one of our favorite traditions was to go apple-picking together. It was such a treat to pick an apple right off the tree and eat it! Of course, we’d come back with barrels of apples and that’s when the fun would really begin … coming up with all kinds of delicious ways to enjoy our bounty of apples!

Since then, we try to make a yearly trip during Thanksgiving break. Unfortunately, apple season has passed and all of the beautiful leaves have fallen from the trees. However, our favorite family-owned apple farm is still open, selling their scrumptious fresh-pressed apple cider and lots of fresh-baked apple treats. Inspired by their delicious apple creations, I developed this delightful grain-free apple streusel upside down cake. It’s like having a little slice of fall each time I bake it!

As shown below, to make this cake as pretty as it is tasty, arrange the apple slices in a pleasing pattern on the bottom of a springform pan. Then, spoon the walnut mixture in a circular pattern across the top of the apple slices, filling in the gaps between the apple slices. Beautiful and delicious!

Apple Streusel Upside Down Cake (GF)

Yield: 8 slices

Apple Streusel Upside Down Cake (GF)

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups blanched almond flour
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened organic applesauce
  • 1/2 cup pure maple syrup
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • Apple Topping
  • 1 medium organic apple
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil (or butter), melted
  • 1 tbsp rapadara (or 2 tbsp maple syrup)
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2/3 cups crispy walnut pieces

Instructions

  1. Step One: Prepare Pan – Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Remove the bottom round of an 9x3-inch springform pan. Using parchment paper, trace the bottom round and cut the paper slightly smaller than the traced circle so that it fits neatly into the bottom (no overlap). Place the bottom back into the springform pan and secure in place. Lightly oil the pan and then place the parchment cut-out into the bottom of the pan and lightly oil. (If you don't have a springform pan, you can use a parchment-lined 9x9-inch baking dish instead.)
  2. Step Two: Prepare Topping – Core and slice one apple (about 1/4 inch slices) and arrange the apple slices in a pleasing pattern on the bottom of the prepared pan/baking dish (as shown in photo above).
  3. In a small bowl, combine the melted butter, rapadura (sucanat) and cinnamon. Then toss the walnuts in the mixture until well coated.
  4. Spoon the walnuts in a circular pattern across the top of the apple slices, filling in the gaps between the apple slices (as shown in photo above).
  5. Place the pan in the oven and bake the topping for 6-8 minutes, just until the apples begin to soften. Then remove from oven and add the cake batter, as described below.
  6. Step Three: Prepare Cake Batter – While the topping is cooking, prepare the cake batter. In a small bowl, combine the almond flour, baking soda, salt and spices. Set aside.
  7. Using an electric hand mixer, blend (on low speed) the applesauce, maple syrup, eggs and vanilla, until well combined.
  8. Slowly mix the dry ingredients into the wet and continue mixing for a full minute, until smooth and well blended.
  9. Gently pour the cake batter over the partially baked apple topping, using a rubber spatula to help remove all of the batter from the bowl. Spread batter evenly across top.
  10. Place back in oven and continue to bake for approximately 25-28 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. (If using a springform pan, I recommend placing the cake pan onto a baking sheet, as some of the apple juice may leak out of the pan during baking.)
  11. Allow cake to cool completely, then remove the springform pan and invert the cake onto a plate or cake stand to serve. (If using a 9x9-inch baking dish, place a serving platter over the top of the baking dish and invert the cake onto the platter.)
  12. Slice, serve and enjoy!
http://thenourishinghome.com/2012/10/apple-pie-cake-gf/

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Comments

  1. Michele says

    Can you use whole wheat flour in place of almond flour, cup for cup? I cannot get almond flour where I live (Israel) : )

    • Kelly says

      Hi, Michele. How funny that I have two Michelle’s in a row asking the same question. Also, I have a friend named Abi who lives in Jordan, I don’t know if that’s where you’re from? But that would be an even bigger coincidence if so. To answer your question … when it comes to substitutions with flour, unfortunately it’s not a simple process. Although you can substitute some gluten-based flours (such as spelt and whole wheat flour) for one another other in most recipes. It’s not possible to do a cup-for-cup substitution replacing almond flour with a gluten-based flour, the results will be less than satisfying! So if you’re not up for developing your own whole grain version, I’d recommend doing a google search for a whole wheat cake recipe and then you’d have a base for adapting this recipe. I hope this helps. Lots of blessings, Kelly

  2. Michelle says

    This looks awesome! Could I substitute spelt or white whole wheat flour 1 to 1 or would it substitute differently for the almond flour? Thanks so much and I am so glad I stumbled upon your blog yesterday :)

    • Kelly says

      Hi, Michelle. Welcome to The Nourishing Home. I’m glad you’re here too! When it comes to substitutions with flour, unfortunately it’s not a simple process. Although you can substitute spelt and whole wheat flour for one another other in most recipes. It’s not possible to do a cup-for-cup substitution replacing almond flour with a gluten-based flour, the results will be less than satisfying! So if you’re not up for developing your own whole grain version, I’d recommend doing a google search for a whole wheat cake recipe and then you’d have a base for adapting this recipe. Or better yet, if you don’t’ have a nut allergy, I highly recommend purchasing some blanched almond flour. It’s a wonderfully healthy option that’s full of protein, fiber and antioxidants. You don’t have to be GF to enjoy it’s delicious taste and nutritional benefits. I hope this helps. Lots of blessings, Kelly

    • Kelly says

      Hi, Susan. Coconut flour is one of my favorite GF flours too. However, blanched almond flour and coconut flour behave very differently. Coconut flour is like a sponge and requires more liquid and eggs than almond flour does. So you’d need to readjust the recipe as a whole. I haven’t experimented with converting this to a coconut flour base, but if you do a google search for a coconut cake, you could possible use that recipe and add the apples, as I describe in my recipe. Just a thought. Blessings, Kelly :)

    • Kelly says

      Thanks, Stacy! I hope you enjoy it as much as we do! Appreciate you taking the time to leave a kind note! Blessings, Kelly :)

  3. Debbie says

    This looks great! Do you know if honey or possibly another sweetner could be used to replace the Maple Syrup? I live in South Africa and Maple syrup is hard to find. Thanks!

    • Kelly says

      Hi, Debbie. You could certainly sub with honey. It generally works well in most recipes, as long as the bake temp it’s above 350 and/or the bake time too long. (Honey can burn easily.) However, you may want to reduce the amount a bit, as I find honey to be sweeter to taste than maple syrup in baked goods – maybe reduce by a tablespoon or two. Let me know how it works out for you? Many blessings, Kelly :)

    • Kelly says

      Thanks so much, Adrienne! I hope you and your family had a very blessed Thanksgiving, my sweet friend! :) Blessings, Kelly

  4. Sheila says

    Hi Michelle, Is sucanat a sweetner? If so, can I sub stevia for it? Also, can I sub coconut nectar syrup for the maple? I am trying to keep the sugar down and anything artificial. Thank you, Sheila

    • Kelly says

      Hi, Shelia. Sucanat (or rapdaura) is the purest form of cane sugar juice. It is unrefined and unprocessed – simply dehydrated cane sugar juice. However, if you’re trying to go for a low glycemic option, then you could certainly substitute with coconut palm sugar and yes, the coconut syrup should work as a sub for maple syrup, although I haven’t tried it myself and so I do not know how sweet it is or how well it incorporates into baked goods. However, if you opt to sub with Stevia, you’ll definitely need to rework this recipe since the ingredients and measurements were formulated to work together, and as you know baking is a science, so substitutions in baking can result in big differences in the outcome. Also, when it comes to stevia, be sure you’re using green stevia, because white stevia is processed/refined. Hope this helps! Blessings, Kelly :)

  5. says

    Can you replace the almond flour with coconut flour? I should think it would be easier than a whole wheat alternative, least I hope its cup for cup.

    This looks absolutely amazing!!

    Andrea

    • Kelly says

      Hi, Andrea! I wish it were that simple to sub one for the other, but unfortunately that’s not the case. Blanched almond flour and coconut flour cannot be substituted interchangeably because they behave very different from one another. Coconut flour is an extremely absorbent flour made from dried coconut meat, so it requires much more liquid and eggs than almond flour does. So your best bet would be to find a coconut flour cake recipe and use that for the batter portion of this recipe. I recommend checking out Tropical Traditions website, as they have a bunch of coconut flour recipes that you can adapt based on your dietary needs. Lots of blessings to you, Kelly :)

      • says

        Thank you very much Kelly … I had hoped it would be simpler but thought it may not be LoL.

        Take care and blessings for the Holidays and New Year.

        Andrea

  6. says

    Thanks for the yummy recipe! Quick question for you. You may not know the answer, but figured I would ask. Any idea how flaxseed would work in place of the eggs? Obviously it wouldn’t be as fluffy. Just wondering if you’ve tried it or have talked to anyone that’s tried it with an egg replacer.

  7. Trish says

    Hi, I just tried this recipe tonight and it was absolutely delicious!!!! I did substitute coconut nectar for the maple syrup because the coconut nectar has a much lower glycemic index and more easily digested. This was the very best cake that I have tasted, bar none. Thanks for sharing this recipe. It will be a favorite of ours from now on. Keep up the great work and God bless you and your family.

    • says

      Wonderful! So glad you all enjoyed this too. Appreciate you taking the time to leave a kind note! Great to know the coconut nectar worked so well! Lots of blessings, Kelly :)

  8. Trish says

    This is one of our favorites!! I use coconut nectar (brand: Coconut Secrets; reason:it has a MUCH lower number on the glycemic index) instead of the maple syrup. It was delicious!!

  9. Trish says

    I’m sorry I just noticed that I had already sent this tip. I must of had a “senior moment”. Sorry.

  10. Jennifer says

    What difference might it make to use non-blanched almonds or soaked and dried almonds? Bitter taste? Pasty? Just fine?

    • says

      Hi, Jennifer. Blanched almond flour is quite different than almond meal (ground almonds with the skins left on). Blanched almond flour is finer and so the result is a lighter, fluffier baked good. Almond meal (with skins) is not as fine of a grind and is a coarser meal so it results in a heavier baked good.

      I only use blanched almond flour so the measurements in this recipe for both the almond flour and liquids/other ingredients are all based on the best result for this particular flour (blanched almond flour). If you opt to substitute, I cannot of guarantee the results, since I haven’t tested other flour options.

      Some people do opt to soak almonds, remove the skins, dry them and then grind the almonds themselves to make their own blanched almond flour. This can be done, but be careful when doing so, as there’s a fine line between almond flour and almond butter. Too long of a grind will start to create nut butter. :) Hope this helps! Blessings, Kelly

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